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New MOOC: Data, Analytics, & Learning

I’ve run a range of open courses on a fairly broad range of platforms: D2L, Moodle, Instructure, a mess of social media tools, and (most frequently) with Stephen Downes’ gRSShopper.

This fall, together with colleagues, I’ll be offering an open course on edX: Data, Analytics, and Learning. From the description:

In education, the use of data and analytics to improve learning is referred to as learning analytics. Analytics have not yet made the impact on education that they have made in other fields. That’s starting to change. Software companies, researchers, educators, and university leaders recognize the value of data in improving not only teaching and learning, but the entire education sector. In particular, learning analytics enables universities, schools, and corporate training departments to improve the quality of learning and overall competitiveness. Research communities such as the International Educational Data Mining Society (IEDMS) and the Society for Learning Analytics Research (SoLAR) are developing promising models for improving learner success through predictive analytics, machine learning, recommender systems (content and social), network analysis, tracking the development of concepts through social systems, discourse analysis, and intervention and support strategies. The era of data and analytics in learning is just beginning.

I’ll provide more information soon about the design of the course – we are focusing on dual structured and self-organized approaches to the course.

3 Comments

  1. Paul-Olivier Dehaye wrote:

    Looking forward to it!

    Friday, June 6, 2014 at 12:08 pm | Permalink
  2. Ben Harwood wrote:

    George, looking forward to following this development. A few observations I have. An x-ray the course on baseball analytics, sabermetrics. Could the way in which some of its data structure was built, could be aligned with learning analytics? Do secure testing centers have any role to play in the deployment of this course initiative? Are Alison and EdX collaborating? Is there any data out there that suggests on the above platforms you’ve used, which one shows most promise corporate wise and another education wise or is the blind of distinction blurring? One last question: do regional secure testing centers and EdX have any projects together? It seems a regional MOOC provider can build connections across higher ed schools and even K12. On a related topic, in terms of high-quality videos for instruction, do public broadcast networks (PBS, BBC, etc) have the ability to partner with EdX providers to distribute wonderful instructional materials in an academic credential building community, for or not for credit?

    Sunday, June 8, 2014 at 6:12 am | Permalink
  3. gsiemens wrote:

    Hi Ben – I haven’t spent much time looking at secure testing centres, though I know many colleagues involved in learning analytics come from an assessment background.

    In terms of platforms – I personally prefer the formats that enable personal creativity. Creative and innovative approaches are better aligned with the attributes of knowledge – i.e. we need innovation in a knowledge age as opposed to duplication.

    Regarding secure regional testing, again, this is not something to which I have devoted time and effort.

    Tuesday, June 10, 2014 at 10:44 am | Permalink