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Hybrid Education

Many aspects of education, training, and development need to be questioned. What has technology (and the internet) made obsolete? How important is space? What can we do at a distance? What does a live lecture add that a good quality recording doesn’t? How can we thin classroom walls and bring in external experts? Or connect with learners in similar courses from around the world? Or what do use from the growing open education pool? Systems are created to serve the needs of an era. When eras change, systems don’t…at least not until they encounter a disruptive force (in education – the financial climate looks like it may serve this role) that causes individuals to question the value of the assumptions underlying the existing systems.
Hybrid Education reviews Carnegie Mellon’s Open Learning Initiative – a project that relies on virtual tutors to change the role of faculty in the learning process: “The virtual tutor takes care of the basic concepts that typically dominate lectures, leaving professors open to plan the face-to-face component of the course according to what parts of the curriculum the software tells him students are picking up more slowly, and what concepts could bear reinforcement.”

2 Comments

  1. Yusuf wrote:

    An examination of Fethullah Gülen’s philosophy of education and the educational activities of the movement (R. Woodhall) :

    http://fethullahgulenconference.org/houston/read.php?p=fethullah-gulen-philosophy-of-education-activities-of-movement

    Friday, January 15, 2010 at 2:10 pm | Permalink
  2. Karl wrote:

    Since the onset of Computer Base Training) CBT, the question of conventional education being the best has not been answered. The human mind is capable of adapting to the learning environment but what is the road block? Hybrid Education brings a larger fear to the table, the fear of change. Change in this case can be a great asset to everyone. Is the internet going away or is it getting larger? Are online studies falling by the wayside or are they growing? Why not put the internet and the classroom together, seems like a natural fit.

    Monday, January 18, 2010 at 12:31 am | Permalink