Skip to content

Plagiarism

I’m putting together a workshop for dealing with plagiarism (I’ll post .ppt notes next week or so) for RRC faculty. I’ve encountered a few useful resources:

Assignments that help reduce plagiarism (via IDOS)
Plagiarism resource page
Plagiarism – Wikipedia
Assessment in Higher Education

Personally, I’m not a big fan of plagiarism detection methods (though I understand they are more critical in certain disciplines). Instead of policing student work, we need to design activities in a manner that requires learners to generate authentic work (problem based learning, simulations, etc.). Even in essay writing, a draft outline with periodic submissions of progress can reduce the likelihood of academic dishonesty. It’s challenging for both educators and students – we are asking them to work and think collaboratively (building on the ideas and thoughts of each other) and yet maintain a sense of individuality.

2 Comments

  1. Matt Moore wrote:

    I am reading your blog as a suggested feed from the Department of Educational Technology at San Diego State, and I wanted to thank you for sharing these ideas on the web. I especially like your comment: “Instead of policing student work, we need to design activities in a manner that requires learners to generate authentic work (problem based learning, simulations, etc.).” There are many tradionalist teachers who have a hard time understanding that this is exactly what needs to be done. The type of assignment that requires learners to think, design, and develop new perspectives will always force students to write originally. Sometimes they need that push. Unfortunately, I have seen teachers unwilling to try new ways of teaching because they view it is a burden to their already established system of notes and materials.

    thanks for the great links.

    Friday, May 19, 2006 at 10:48 am | Permalink
  2. Dave wrote:

    I agree that we shouldn’t be working nearly as hard as we are to detect it and instead dedicate our time and focus to prevent it. As educators we have to ask ourselves why our students feel the need to plagiarize and what we can do to help them move beyond it…is it that they were poorly equipped to write in the first place? Do the students not value their own thoughts enough to articulate them in an original format? Do people feel so overwhelmed by the dearth of information available that they are ill-equipped to synthesize their thoughts? Are we failing them at one level or another? I think in order to beat this problem we need to get to the root of why it’s happening in the first place and also identify approaches to instruction that place a much higher value individual differences and ideas.

    Friday, May 19, 2006 at 12:12 pm | Permalink